Dining

Our kitchen is helmed by chef Andrew Rodriguez, who has cooked at some of the finest establishments in the New York metropolitan area, including Michelin star winning A Voce Madison and A Voce Columbus.

 

Breakfast

Mackinnon, L. T., and S. L. Hooper. "Overtraining and overreaching: Causes, effects and prevention." (2000): 487-498. Several investigations have suggested that overtraining is best monitored by athletes themselves using self-analysis tools. Daily documentation by athletes including sources and ratings of stress, fatigue, muscle soreness, quality of sleep, irritability, and perceived exertion during training or standardized exercise may be effective in predicting and identifying overtraining. Read More

Brunch

Hooper, Sue L., and Laurel Traeger Mackinnon. Australian Sports Commission (1996) The purpose of this study was to extend our previous research on objective indicators of recovery during the taper period prior to competition and to examine the athletes' response to different tapering techniques. The project aimed to address the following questions: 1. Do daily self-ratings of well-being by the athlete reliably indicate successful recovery and competitive performance? 2. How should the training load be reduced during the taper so that recovery and performance are maximised? Read More

Lunch

Hooper, Sue L., and Laurel Traeger Mackinnon. Australian Sports Commission (1996) The purpose of this study was to extend our previous research on objective indicators of recovery during the taper period prior to competition and to examine the athletes' response to different tapering techniques. The project aimed to address the following questions: 1. Do daily self-ratings of well-being by the athlete reliably indicate successful recovery and competitive performance? 2. How should the training load be reduced during the taper so that recovery and performance are maximised? Read More

Midday

Hooper, Sue L., and Laurel Traeger Mackinnon. Sports medicine 20.5 (1995): 321-327. Identification of markers of overtraining would allow coaches and athletes to confidently adjust training loads to maximise training benefits yet avoid overtraining, thereby, optimising performance. The purpose of this leading article is to provide recommendations for the monitoring of overtraining in athletes. In the process, this review will highlight some of the problems associated with determining the appropriate method for monitoring athletes. Overtraining and overtraining syndrome have been extensively reviewed in several recent papersII-3] and this paper does not attempt to present the current state of knowledge on this topic. Read More

Dinner

Saw, Anna E., Luana C. Main, and Paul B. Gastin. British journal of sports medicine (2015): bjsports-2015. This review provides further support for practitioners to use subjective measures to monitor changes in athlete well-being in response to training. Subjective measures may stand alone, or be incorporated into a mixed methods approach to athlete monitoring, as is current practice in many sport settings. Read More

 
 

Drinks

Pinewood has a complete bar program, covering everything from classic cocktails similar to The Patterson House, to easily shareable pitchers of beer. We offer cocktails, craft beer, punches, and a wide variety of bourbons, along with hand-chiseled ice to make each drink unique.

 

Cocktails

Mackinnon, L. T., and S. L. Hooper. "Overtraining and overreaching: Causes, effects and prevention." (2000): 487-498. Several investigations have suggested that overtraining is best monitored by athletes themselves using self-analysis tools. Daily documentation by athletes including sources and ratings of stress, fatigue, muscle soreness, quality of sleep, irritability, and perceived exertion during training or standardized exercise may be effective in predicting and identifying overtraining. Read More

Brunch

Hooper, Sue L., and Laurel Traeger Mackinnon. Australian Sports Commission (1996) The purpose of this study was to extend our previous research on objective indicators of recovery during the taper period prior to competition and to examine the athletes' response to different tapering techniques. The project aimed to address the following questions: 1. Do daily self-ratings of well-being by the athlete reliably indicate successful recovery and competitive performance? 2. How should the training load be reduced during the taper so that recovery and performance are maximised? Read More

Wines

Hooper, Sue L., and Laurel Traeger Mackinnon. Australian Sports Commission (1996) The purpose of this study was to extend our previous research on objective indicators of recovery during the taper period prior to competition and to examine the athletes' response to different tapering techniques. The project aimed to address the following questions: 1. Do daily self-ratings of well-being by the athlete reliably indicate successful recovery and competitive performance? 2. How should the training load be reduced during the taper so that recovery and performance are maximised? Read More

Beer

Hooper, Sue L., and Laurel Traeger Mackinnon. Sports medicine 20.5 (1995): 321-327. Identification of markers of overtraining would allow coaches and athletes to confidently adjust training loads to maximise training benefits yet avoid overtraining, thereby, optimising performance. The purpose of this leading article is to provide recommendations for the monitoring of overtraining in athletes. In the process, this review will highlight some of the problems associated with determining the appropriate method for monitoring athletes. Overtraining and overtraining syndrome have been extensively reviewed in several recent papersII-3] and this paper does not attempt to present the current state of knowledge on this topic. Read More

Mocktails

Saw, Anna E., Luana C. Main, and Paul B. Gastin. British journal of sports medicine (2015): bjsports-2015. This review provides further support for practitioners to use subjective measures to monitor changes in athlete well-being in response to training. Subjective measures may stand alone, or be incorporated into a mixed methods approach to athlete monitoring, as is current practice in many sport settings. Read More

Spirits List

Saw, Anna E., Luana C. Main, and Paul B. Gastin. British journal of sports medicine (2015): bjsports-2015. This review provides further support for practitioners to use subjective measures to monitor changes in athlete well-being in response to training. Subjective measures may stand alone, or be incorporated into a mixed methods approach to athlete monitoring, as is current practice in many sport settings. Read More

 
 

Coffee

Our coffee program has been carefully cultivated with the help of the geniuses at Crema Coffee, an award-winning local coffee shop where we also get all of our beans. We offer all standard coffee and espresso drinks, along with a selection of teas, and a few custom Pinewood creations. Stop by for your morning cup of joe, and grab a pastry to go – or stay and hang out…

 

Coffee + Tea

Mackinnon, L. T., and S. L. Hooper. "Overtraining and overreaching: Causes, effects and prevention." (2000): 487-498. Several investigations have suggested that overtraining is best monitored by athletes themselves using self-analysis tools. Daily documentation by athletes including sources and ratings of stress, fatigue, muscle soreness, quality of sleep, irritability, and perceived exertion during training or standardized exercise may be effective in predicting and identifying overtraining. Read More